Federation Of African Nursing Science Students' Organisations - 1st International African Nursing Students Conference and Academic Research Symposium (19-21 Decemeber, 2016 - Kigali, Rwanda)

By Munashe Nyika | 28 Oct, 2016

Dear friends, mentors and colleagues,

It is my great honor and privilege to invite you on behalf of the Federation of African Nursing Science Students Organisations' to the 1st International African Nursing Students Conference and Academic Research Symposium to be held from the 19th - 21st of December 2016 in Kigali, Rwanda.

As the Federation of African Nursing Science Students Organisations (FANSSO), our mission is to uphold the impact of the nursing discipline in society today through creating a platform where nursing students in nations across Africa can actively engage in the promotion of the highest level of nursing education, practice and research within the continent.

The conference to be held at the University of Rwanda, seeks to bring together nursing students from across Africa to be a part of developing the vision and structure of this organization, in so doing contributing to mapping the future of nursing students across the continent. We hope to have the conference be as representative as possible to encourage inclusive decision making towards election of the 1st International African Nursing Students Committee, and as such we seek the endorsement and backing of the international nursing community towards helping to shape the future of this young organization, encouraging nursing students from across Africa to register for the conference, and be a part of this global health movement and historic seminar.

It is our fervent belief that your support towards this initiative shall yield a massive boost towards the strengthening of healthcare systems in nations across Africa and solidifying nursing's impact and position at the centre of healthcare and development within societies across Africa. We look forward not only to your great response, but to reaching more and more students in nursing across the African Continent towards building among them global health leadership, effective partnership, innovative solutions and multi-disciplinary collaboration toward the improved health and well-being of both people in Africa and across the globe.

A link to the conference registration form can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/xcBWtWYbT1AktrcY2
Abstracts can be submitted using the following link: https://goo.gl/forms/7cwNwBf44lZ0js6n1

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Replies

 

Blen Biru Replied at 1:33 AM, 20 Nov 2016

Thank you for sharing the detailed information about the first International African Nursing Students Conference in Rwanda this December.
Earlier this week, I came across two articles regarding hospital care during child birth in Ethiopia. One of the articles states that 90.1% mothers in Ethiopia do not give birth in a health facility and prefer traditional attendants. The abuse and disrespect women experience during child birth were reported as some of the reasons women avoid health facilities. These data indicate how big a role nurses/midwives can play in making a difference and in attracting women to hospitals. I wanted to know if this conference will address issues revolving good communication and respectful care. I am also interested to know if this is a challenge faced in other African countries as well and what’s being done to promote a dignified patient centered care.  I have attached the articles for reference.

Attached resources:

Blen Biru Replied at 1:37 AM, 20 Nov 2016

Thank you for sharing the detailed information about the first International African Nursing Students Conference in Rwanda this December.
Earlier this week, I came across two articles regarding hospital care during child birth in Ethiopia. One of the articles states that 90.1% mothers in Ethiopia do not give birth in a health facility and prefer traditional attendants. The abuse and disrespect women experience during child birth were reported as some of the reasons they avoid health facilities. These data indicate how big a role nurses/midwives can play in making a difference and in attracting women to hospitals. I wanted to know if this conference will address issues revolving around good communication and respectful care. I am also interested to know if this is a challenge faced in other African countries as well and what’s being done to promote a dignified patient centered care. I have attached the articles for reference.

Attached resources:

Robyn Aitken Replied at 8:31 PM, 20 Nov 2016

Thank you for including this paper Blen Biru
I am current the Chief Investigator of a study examining organisational cultural competence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australian maternity services. Although the contexts appear widely different at first glance, and Australian women have limited access to home birth (via experienced midwives rather than traditional birth attendants), the findings about the negative aspects of birthing in a health facility were similar to the underpinning rationale for our study.We have developed a self-assessment tool based on evidence relating to organisational cultural competency which we hope will provide a mechanism for quality improvement. That is, health services will have a measure of organisational cultural competence as a starting point and identify areas where they can improve, with a view to repeating the self-assessment after a set period of time. Our purpose is to improve the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in a country where there is high engagement with health services, but still poorer health outcomes for a section of our community. Until reading this paper we had not considered how this tool might be useful in improving engagement with health services in areas where health outcomes could be significantly improved by more women birthing in health facilities.
Thank you for this prompt

Robyn

Inge Corless Moderator Replied at 8:55 PM, 20 Nov 2016

I, too, have heard about the disrespectful care given to maternity patients in health care centers by nurses and midwives. I am also aware that health care staff have inadequate equipment. Nonetheless, it distresses me to think of patients receiving poor care from nurses and midwives. The maternal mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa is appalling with hemorrhage being one of the primary causes. I know there are others like you doing your best to rectify the situation. Thank you so much. The women of sub-Saharn Africa deserve better from us.

Munashe Nyika Replied at 5:17 AM, 22 Nov 2016

Thank you Blen Biru for the prompt and including this paper. Indeed,
despite the many advances that have been made in making healthcare services
more accessible to communities across the continent, the number of women
that still prefer to give birth with the aid of traditional attendants as
compared to within healthcare facilities remains high across a number of
countries.The attitudes and behaviors of maternal health care providers are
an important element of quality as they influence both positively and
negatively on how women, and their partners and families perceive and
experience maternal health care. Lack of respectful care from providers
does indeed lead to dissatisfaction with the health system, diminishing
their likelihood of seeking antenatal (ANC), delivery and postnatal services.
Indeed the aim of this conference is to engage nursing and midwifery
students, and early career professionals in Africa to discuss on both the
issue of respectful care of patients and more in fostering nurses and
midwives with a better understanding of quality healthcare services in
healthcare delivery. In countries across the continent a number of quality
assurance programs and workshops are conducted annually to promote the
highest standards of care within healthcare institutions. As a group it is
our hope that through having incoming nurses and midwives advocating for
the more respectful care of patients in healthcare institutions and
conducting more community-based education programs on the benefits of
giving birth in healthcare facilities, more women will be able to access
maternal healthcare services in a better, more respectful, and dignified
environment.